Plaster Casting

As I’ve done one method of plaster casting, I thought I should do the other to see if I can capture an objects likeness better. Also, if I was to go on with the ideas of multiple limbs I’ve had and mentioned before then I’ll need to find either some silicone, so I’m not limited on how many times I can use the mould, or more than one method of creating multiple copies. This method include the use of modroc and works by creating a mould of the object, by coating it in strips of modroc, and then securing it in place whilst pouring plaster of paris inside. Once the plaster is set the outside mould is destroyed as it has to be torn off, revealing the cast to be a detailed replica of the object. The good thing about this method is the modroc sets relatively fast, the bad thing being it gets destroyed after one use.

For this I used a polystyrene head and decided to create a cast of a face, as I began to think what it would look like if I could add faces to the limbs I’m creating. The modroc dries relatively faster than the previous methods I’ve used which could be a good thing as I could just make both silicone and modroc moulds, modroc whilst the silicone dries and so on.

DSCN2344

Modroc cast face.

I think this turned out terribly, and I’m not entirely sure why other than I might not have tapped it enough to allow the plaster to get into every crevice. I did notice how the bumps of the polystyrene showed up in the plaster, showing that the modroc method captures the same amount of details as the alginate.

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Detailing of the bumps captured from the polystyrene.

Although this wasn’t a success I do think it has potential to work if I try again a few more times to get a feel of what I’m doing wrong. I could ask certain tutors on how to improve the condition also, to possibly improve the outcome.

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